Friday, March 9, 2007

WARNING: Mothering Magazine is PURE EVIL

Warning, Fathers everywhere:

DO NOT, upon pain of her sanity and your peace of mind, allow your wife to read this month's issue of Mothering Magazine. Seriously, if you have it at your house and she hasn't gotten it yet, go and take a razor and remove page 33/34.

My wife came home in tears from it. There's an article about a stillborn baby -- one of those therapy parts where the mommy celebrates the dead child's birthday and still talks about her as if she's alive -- sad, sad. Bad enough that they'd even publish it, period. So my wife skipped it. On the next page is a LARGE black and white photo of the mother and father cuddling the dead baby. It's so terrible, even a tough bastard like me got sad when I saw it.

I sent them a pissed off email, but I doubt it will amount to much. This magazine should be on the restricted list or something... labeled DO NOT SHOW TO EMOTIONALLY VULNERABLE WOMEN, ESPECIALLY MOTHERS.

Here's the rant I emailed to the Managing Editor, the Publisher, and the Circulation Manager:



To: peggyo@mothering.com, melissac@mothering.com, johnm@mothering.com
Subject: Please cancel my subscription and refund my money

And apologize to my wife.

Let me explain. My wife, a new mother with a three month old son, asked for a subscription to your nice, happy magazine as a Christmas present, so she'd have some happy and uplifting reading material for the train ride home from work.

Let me tell you a little about us. I'm a stay-home Daddy. I walked away from a big-time job to become one. My wife has almost killed herself to provide my son with sufficient breast milk to consume only her milk while she's at work -- we have a dedicated freezer for the stuff. We're cloth diapering, organic-food-eating, Maya-Wrap wearing, attachment parenting hardworking people who found your magazine at Whole Foods. We're good people.

This is my wife's first week back at work. It's been tough for her. So Wednesday night she was happy to get your magazine in the mail, a nice happy uplifting thing to read on the train to get her in the mood for some quality boobie-time with our son.

She opens it up, starts reading. Gets to page 33, realizes on the second paragraph that it's a story about a woman with a stillborn child. Says, "wow, i can't believe they'd publish a sad story like this in the magazine, I can't deal with this, I better turn the page."

Turns the page.

Is confronted with a giant picture of the couple and their dead baby. Starts crying, sobbing. She's still scarred! WHAT KIND OF PSYCHO'S WOULD PUT A PICTURE OF A DEAD BABY IN A MAGAZINE FOR MOTHERS?

Can you imagine a third-trimester lady's reaction? GOOD GRIEF. We have a healthy baby and both of us are shocked. It's just the saddest, most terrible story in the world and if people want to tell stories like that, as therapy, fine -- but a magazine for mothers is not the place.

My wife is seriously scarred and cannot get that image out of her head.

You can keep your magazine; you've lost us and our spending dollar. We don't need this kind of suffering in our free-time happy reading.

I would like a refund of my subscription fee. You can send it along with your apology to my home address.

Thank you for your attention

2 comments:

Jo said...

Oh Mothering Magazine (and their stupid ass forums) are evil for so so many other reasons. Trust me!

I'm sorry for your wife. When my kids were little I spent the first year of each one's life almost paralized by the fear of SIDS.

Furrow said...

I can see your point, but bad shit like that does happen to good people. It took me two years to conceive, and I've wrapped myself up in a community of other women who have been through infertility, miscarriages, and stillbirths. For some, the stillbirth is the only birth they'll ever have. Others go on to have healthy children, but that first tragic stillbirth remains forever imprinted on their souls. Some women are lucky and never experience any emotional pain associated with conceiving, pregnancy, or childbirth, but for those who do, their stories should be honored and shared. Many readers of Mothering have been through such pain.